THIS

Progressive politics, ideas & culture

Menu

racism

January-February 2018

ACTION SHOT: Fighting racism in Quebec

Photo by Christopher Curtis

This Magazine@thismagazine

The past few months in Quebec have been tough for activists fighting against racism. In October, the government passed Bill 62, a highly controversial piece of legislation that aims to “neutralize” Quebecers’ religious garb while receiving public services. The bill appeared to target Muslim face coverings in particular, including the niqab and burka. The legislation […] More »
November-December 2017

How voice casting for video games has made the Canadian industry more homogenous than ever

Improved video game technology should have made more room for visible minorities. Instead, it’s created more jobs for white people

Mike Sholars@Sholarsenic

When you love something,  you want to know it loves you back. It’s why we look for ourselves in art: We want to see reflections of our struggles acknowledged, and we long to hear stories where we can be heroes. As a Black and Indian child of the 1990s, I was starving to see myself […] More »
November-December 2017

No, Canada isn’t the beacon of racial tolerance that it’s made out to be

As Robyn Maynard writes in her new book, Policing Black Lives, invisibility has not protected Black communities in Canada

Robyn Maynard

Canada, in the eyes of many of its citizens, as well as those living elsewhere, is imagined as a beacon of tolerance and diversity. Seen as an exemplar of human rights, Canada’s national and international reputation rests, in part, on its historical role as the safe haven for the enslaved Black Americans who had fled […] More »

What Jagmeet Singh’s win means for the NDP—and its supporters of colour

He's the first visible minority to lead a federal party, and that holds great responsibility

Brittany Andrew-Amofah@BrittanyAmofah

This month, the NDP and Canada achieved a historical first. Jagmeet Singh, former Member of Provincial Parliament in the Ontario legislature was named the eighth leader of the federal NDP. The moment marked a dramatic shift for the party, which has struggled to connect with youth and racialized voters. But it also signifies new possibilities […] More »

Hey, Margaret Wente: Racism is still a serious problem in Canada

The national columnist's recent column suggests racism is no longer a defining feature of our society

Amy Oldfield

Margaret Wente is confused about racism. That is the most generous interpretation I can offer for her recent Globe and Mail article, “The good news about racism,” in which she argues that racism is vanishing from society. It is declining at such a rate, in fact, that the recent resurgence of white supremacy is a […] More »
July-August 2017

Half a century after the destruction of Africville, Nova Scotia still has a race problem

For many, the reparations do not sufficiently address the devastating effect the loss of Africville has had on Nova Scotia’s Black community

Madi Haslam@madihaslam

This year, Canada celebrates its 150th birthday. Ours is a country of rich history—but not all Canadian stories are told equally. In this special report, This tackles 13 issues—one per province and territory—that have yet to be addressed and resolved by our country in a century and a half Fifty years ago, the city of Halifax destroyed […] More »
March-April 2017

New film takes a much-needed glance into Canada’s uncomfortable past with racism and slavery

An inside look at Howard J. Davis's C'est Moi

Melissa Gonik

She strolls softly through a deserted modern-day Montreal. Her outfit—and the way she seems to float through the streets—indicate her lack of connection to this modern scene. This is Marie-Josèphe Angélique, a slave “owned” by François Poulin of Montreal in the early 1730s. Canadian filmmaker Howard J. Davis uses his film C’est Moi as an […] More »
January-February 2016

Standing ovation

How one playwright confronts stereotypes of black women through her work

Vivien Fellegi

TORONTO PLAYWRIGHT ANDREA SCOTT started to wonder about the secret lives of her neighbours after watching the U.K. television film I am Slave, based on the true story of a modern-day captive. In the film, Arab militia snatch Mende Nazar from her Sudanese village and sell her into slavery; she eventually lands in England, where […] More »
November-December 2015

Need not apply

Each year, thousands of university graduates move to Korea to teach English. But why are so many of them white—and what does this say about racism here in Canada?

Dave HazzanWebsite@DaveHazzan

About five years ago, a rumour began circulating in South Korea that Indian and Filipino nationals might become eligible for E-2 English teaching visas. At this time, I had already been teaching in Korea for eight years on and off. It had been a wonderful resource for paying for backpacking trips through Asia and boozy […] More »
July-August 2015

One year later

Denise Hansen

Denise Hansen examines the Black Lives Matter movement in Canada—and why there’s cause for anger and hope here, too PROTESTS AND MARCHES AND SIT-INS have never really been my chosen course of social action. I can remember my dear family friend Kathy, a valiant social justice advocate, trying over the years to introduce my tender, […] More »

Gender Block: don’t get mad, we’re going to talk about privilege

Hillary Di Menna

Why don’t people just admit their privilege?! It can get pretty infuriating hearing people of privilege say oppression doesn’t exist, that anyone who says otherwise is too politically correct and/or sensitive. That meritocracy is totally how the world works. A cartoon by Ronnie Ritchie explains this nicely, with the example of feminism. The heading is, […] More »