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March-April 2018

Montreal group turns competitive skating into contemporary art

Meet Le Patin Libre

Allyson Aritcheta

Taking to the ice with smooth transitions and ever-changing focal points, contemporary ice skating company Le Patin Libre uses minimalistic choreography to create a performance that founder Alexandre Hamel calls “magical.” The Montreal-based troupe, founded by Hamel in 2005, focuses on providing a skating experience for its audience that’s free from competition and scores. “It’s […] More »
March-April 2018

South Asian women are finally receiving the representation they deserve in media

Prajakta Dhopade on why now more than ever they're having their moment

Prajakta Dhopade

Growing up in Canada in the mid-2000s, there was never quite a role model in Western popular culture who looked like me. As an 11-year-old, it didn’t occur to me that there was anything amiss with my pop idols, or that their portrayals of North American life were missing an important element of cultural relevance […] More »
March-April 2018

Indigiqueer storyteller Joshua Whitehead turns hope and frustration into literature

The artist, known for his captivating poetry, is now working on his debut novel

Justine Ponomareff

Joshua Whitehead has a lot to say. The 29- year-old Oji-cree, Two-Spirit otâcimow, or storyteller, often finds himself fuelled by anger: from the day-to-day frustrations to systemic-sized injustices, and Canada’s political climate and the ongoing colonization of Indigenous peoples in Canada. His collection of poetry, full metal indigiqueer, came from this fire, this feeling “of wanting […] More »

Q&A: Kenneth Moffatt on the importance of highlighting art for and by those from marginalized communities

The Ryerson University sociology professor is the 2018 Jack Layton Chair of Social Justice—and he has big plans for the role

RM Vaughan

Kenneth Moffatt is the 2018 Jack Layton Chair of Social Justice. That sounds fancy, and it is. Appointed across the Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Community Services, the Chair emphasizes the causes of the late NDP leader, and works “to effect progressive social change.” But to many Torontonians, especially those of us in the queer arts worlds, Moffatt […] More »
January-February 2018

West-coast all-Indigenous burlesque group destroys stereotypes with their performances

Meet Virago Nation

Megan Jenkins

With the first chord of “Burn Your Village to the Ground,” the song accompanying a burlesque act titled “Not Your Stereotype,” a transformation begins. The figures on stage, dressed in racist caricatures of Indigeneity—feathered headdresses, wearing “Indian” Halloween costumes, carrying “Made in China” dreamcatchers—begin to shed their layers. The commodified image of the “Indian” is […] More »
January-February 2018

New collaborative art installation brings Winnipeg residents together

The mural allows even those without an arts background to participate

Jenna Anderson

Works of art are often able to draw people together and show their connections. Ojibwe artist Jessica Canard thought up the design for her recent mural with this goal in mind. Commissioned by the National Arts Centre in partnership with the University of Winnipeg, Canard combined her years of experience making murals and facilitating art […] More »

Toronto film screenings break down female representation on the big screen

Inside the bimonthly series Bechdel Tested

Hanna Lee@hanlllee

For Erica Shiner, 2015 marked the year she first launched herself into the world of feminist activism. That May, she started a petition to stop American rapper Action Bronson from performing at Toronto’s Yonge-Dundas Square for annual music festival North by Northeast, saying his lyrics “[glorify] gang-raping and murdering women.” After gaining more than 40,000 […] More »
January-February 2018

Whose job is it to tackle sexism in comedy?

The onus often falls on women—but it shouldn't

Stephanie Philp

I take improv on Wednesday nights in a basement dance studio with floors so sensitive we’re not allowed to wear outdoor shoes on them. The ratio of men to women in the class is about five to one, which is pretty normal. It’s my turn to play. On stage my scene partner stations himself at […] More »
January-February 2018

Nunavut-based recording label Aakuluk Music is on a mission to keep—and grow—talent in Canada’s North

A look inside Nunavut's first record label

Jackie Hong

Nancy Mike knows the challenges of being a musician in Canada’s North all too well. The throat singer and accordion player for Iqaluit band The Jerry Cans recalls when the band—whose fusion of Inuit throat singing, Inuktitut lyrics, and folk-rock sound have won them an international fanbase—recorded in home studios without adequate equipment, space, or […] More »
January-February 2018

New exhibit at Saskatoon’s contemporary art museum sheds light on Indigenous histories and beyond

Inside the Remai Modern

Linda Nguyen

Nestled along the riverbank of the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon stands the Remai Modern, the new contemporary art museum that currently houses Indigenous artifacts from artists of the Treaty 6 territory—the land on which this $84.6 million facility resides. Determined by the river, a collaborative exhibition by Ontario-based artists Duane Linklater and Tanya Lukin […] More »
November-December 2017

Inside Edmonton’s first Indigenous art park

Carrying the theme “the stories of This Place,” each piece will showcase different ways Indigenous people connect to the land

Brandi Morin

A unique endeavour to transform an undeveloped area of land within Edmonton into an Indigenous art park is the first of its kind in Canada. Slated to open in the fall of 2018, the Indigenous art park named ᐄᓃᐤ (ÎNÎW) River Lot 11∞, pronounced (EE-NU) River Lot 11, is a partnership between the City of […] More »