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Environment

March-April 2019

No Dog Should Die Alone

As extreme weather events multiply, the number of dogs dying in shelters and on the streets does too. Here's how one organization is helping them make the final transition with grace.

Nicole Simone

All rescues start with an endearing photo or video: a dog peering through a set of bars wondering what’s next. Rooney’s story was no different. His video showed a partially blind senior dog; a defeated glance at the camera, then a slow turn around to go sit in the back of the filthy kennel. When […] More »
March-April 2019

A greener goodbye

Even in death, North Americans tend to leave a stomping carbon footprint. But there’s a better way.

Zakiya Kassam

With around 269,000 deaths reported each year in Canada, the death biz is more invested in our mortality than ever. But this billion-dollar industry needs us more than we need it: big-ticket items and services, such as embalming, caskets and tombstones, are as superfluous as they are environmentally damaging. Green burials came to North America […] More »
November-December 2018

Dear Future Great-Grandchild… Forgive Us

The world we'll leave behind won't be a pretty one

Michael Polanyi

DEAR FUTURE GREAT-GRANDCHILD, I will likely never meet you. I will never know the mid-21st-century world in which you will live. I hope you will be blessed with the opportunities and joys that I have experienced: the magic of visiting a pristine lake, the friendliness and generosity of neighbours, an array of vocational opportunities, and […] More »
January-February 2018

Meet Canada’s most endangered species, from coast to coast to coast

Bears, chickens, fish, and more are slowly disappearing from our country's wildlife

Allison Baker

In October 2017, WWF-Canada released its “Living Planet Report,” assessing the country’s endangered and threatened species. Their findings paint a bleak picture of Canada’s wildlife: Between 1970 and 2014, half of the 903 monitored species had declined in population—a loss of approximately 83 percent on average. Habitat destruction, climate change, and human activity are the […] More »
January-February 2018

Students vs. Big Oil

Canadian universities are investing in oil giants, and students are putting up a fight. Inside the battle for divestment on campuses across the country

Madi Haslam@madihaslam

On a February morning in 2017, Tina Oh and more than 50 students are waiting impatiently in Mawita’mkw, a small gathering space for Indigenous students and community members at Mount Allison University in Sackville, N.B. Anxious chatter fills the room until suddenly, it’s silent. “It’s time,” Oh tells them, and the students, dressed entirely in […] More »
November-December 2017

After a century-long absence, bison are returning to Canada’s national parks

Sixteen of the animals were successfully reintroduced at Banff National Park earlier this year

Kyle Edwards

There was a time when close to 30 million bison roamed the plains of what is now Canada and the United States. In the mid-1800s, after the influx of European settlers, the animal—once the most abundant large mammal on the continent—was hunted to near extinction. But the bison has returned to Canada’s oldest national park. […] More »
July-August 2017

New ecological project takes stock of Calgary’s amphibian life

The project will provide insight into the health of the city's wetlands

Allyson Aritcheta@ariCheddar

A woman in a coral windbreaker peeks through cattails on the periphery of a marsh, her rubber boots camouflaged by vegetation and mud as she strains, clipboard in hand, to detect signs of amphibian life. A frog hops into a beam of sunlight through the dense flora and she marks a tick on her clipboard. […] More »
July-August 2017

Should Canadians live on former industrial sites?

Public officials say sites along Montreal's Lachine Canal are safe for residents to live on—but pollution remains a problem

Patrick Maynard

The Lachine Canal is emblematic of Montreal’s revival. Tourists write about it. Modern condos sprout up next to it. A bike path running along the waterway is rated among the world’s best rides. But alongside the canal’s booming recreational offerings are the remnants of its industrial history. A review of a national database of federal industrial […] More »
July-August 2017

Why are Saskatchewan parks losing crucial funding?

The province's Meewasin Valley struggles to keep afloat after funding loss

Allyson Aritcheta@ariCheddar

This year, Canada celebrates its 150th birthday. Ours is a country of rich history—but not all Canadian stories are told equally. In this special report, This tackles 13 issues—one per province and territory—that have yet to be addressed and resolved by our country in a century and a half Along a winding trail on both sides of […] More »
July-August 2017

Canadians need better protection from oil sands cleanup liabilities

The future for oil sands mining is uncertain at best, but companies must account for the social and environmental costs now

Jodi McNeill@jodi_lm3

This year, Canada celebrates its 150th birthday. Ours is a country of rich history—but not all Canadian stories are told equally. In this special report, This tackles 13 issues—one per province and territory—that have yet to be addressed and resolved by our country in a century and a half Canada’s oil sands have long been a lightning rod […] More »
May-June 2017

Canada’s environmental assessments suck—and they’re devastating our land

How our country plans to reform them

Andrew Reeves

Ken Boon lives on a “little piece of heaven,” lost to the world in British Columbia’s Peace River bottomlands. His wife, Arlene, grew up in Fort St. John on a homestead her grandfather purchased in the 1940s. The property, where the pair farm grains and run an 18-acre market garden, overlooks Cache Creek, a tributary of […] More »