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indigenous rights

September-October 2018

Why did a young mother die in an alley after she was admitted to hospital? Her family says it’s because she was Indigenous

Windy Sinclair went to a Winnipeg ER. Three hours later, she went missing. Her body was found frozen in an alleyway three days after.

Ryan Thorpe

It was freezing in Winnipeg, cold enough that frostbite threatened to set in minutes; the kind of cold that sets deep in the bones, down to the marrow. Unforgiving wind ripped through flat, icy streets, and snowdrifts piled along sidewalks. A frigid, stainless steel sky descended on the prairie capital. By the time Windy Sinclair, […] More »
September-October 2018

ACTION SHOT: Camping for justice at Saskatchewan’s Wascana Park

Photo by Eagleclaw Bunnie Thom

This Magazine

At Wascana Park in Regina sits a group of protesters, their teepees erected around them. They are waiting. Camped out just across from the Saskatchewan Legislature, the group wants justice after the deaths of Tina Fontaine and Colten Boushie, two Indigenous youth whose accused killers were acquitted of murder charges. The camp set up in […] More »
July-August 2018

EXCERPT: Remembering the Sixties Scoop

Inside Ohpikiihaakan-ohpimeh (Raised Somewhere Else) by Colleen Cardinal

Colleen Cardinal

In this excerpt, Colleen Cardinal tells her story of being a child of the Sixties Scoop when she and 20,000 Indigenous children in Canada were taken from their homes to be placed in foster care or were adopted. There was a huge disparity between how us girls and our adoptive brother were treated. As a […] More »
July-August 2018

Inside Inuit homelessness in Montreal

A disproportionate number of Inuit slip into homelessness after landing in Montreal

Samantha Scalise

At any given time there are 150 to 200 Nunavik Inuit in Montreal accompanying a loved one receiving medical care. The lack of basic services in their northern communities forces a vast number of Inuit to fly south to receive treatment in the city. Once they arrive, many Inuit opt to stay in Montreal in an […] More »
July-August 2018

It’s time to stop cottaging on Indigenous land

Because the land we relax on—and take for granted—isn't our land

Denise Hansen

Every Canada Day long weekend, thousands of us leave smoggy cities and flood hurriedly north to summer homes. We can’t wait to escape to our little slice of paradise, our piece of the natural Canadian landscape we’ve dedicated to pleasure, relaxation, and tranquility. We spend the long weekend unplugged or revelling in one too many […] More »
July-August 2018

ACTION SHOT: Protesting the Trans Mountain Pipeline extension

At the pipeline's construction site, on Burnaby Mountain

This Magazine

Since the Trans Mountain Pipeline extension project was approved by the Trudeau government in 2016, the west coast’s Indigenous communities have fought to cease potential damages on their land. The project, which would extend the pipeline from Edmonton to the Vancouver area, runs through several First Nations communities in B.C. and Alberta—and protests have been […] More »
May-June 2018

Canada’s pioneer myth

Canadians are raised to be proud of our history, attending festivals, fairs, and field trips to learn more about our colonial past. But our collective celebration may be bolstering our country's racist tendencies

Daniel Panneton

The unpunished killing of 22-year-old Cree man Colten Boushie in Saskatchewan has raised serious questions about the legacy of colonialism in shaping settlerIndigenous relations. Gerald Stanley, the white farmer who faced murder charges after shooting Boushie on his land, was ultimately acquitted by an all-white jury in February. Stanley’s acquittal fits into a long pattern […] More »
March-April 2018

“Am I Inuk enough?”

On the complex process of language reclamation among Canada's Inuit

Sarah Rogers

Alexia Galloway-Alainga pushes in a pair of earbuds to tune out the clatter of cutlery and coffee cups hitting cafeteria tables at Ottawa’s Carleton University. She looks straight into her smartphone camera, wearing a slight smile, and begins speaking: Sanngijuq, she says slowly, the last syllable coming from the back of her throat. The Inuktitut […] More »
March-April 2018

Why protesters are against an Indigenous confederacy’s deer harvest

Understanding the Haudenosaunee deer hunt and its opposition

Allyson Aritcheta

Last fall, Haudenosaunee hunters made their way to the forest with archery equipment for an annual six-day deer harvest. At Short Hills Provincial Park, just southwest of St. Catharines, Ont., the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry collaborated to create a safe space for the hunters. But despite the obvious government support, […] More »
March-April 2018

What’s the true cost of clean drinking water for Canada’s First Nations?

The Indigenous water crisis, by the numbers

Anwar Ali

Every day a member of the Kinonjeoshtegon First Nation drives 70 kilometres from Lake Winnipeg’s western shore to a store in Dallas/Red Rose, Man. to buy 40 20-litre jugs of drinking water. That water is intended for elders and single mothers on the Jackhead Reserve, as Kinonjeoshtegon is also known, who don’t have access to […] More »
January-February 2018

How a Yukon prison failed its highest-profile inmate

Michael Nehass spent more than 2,000 days in the Whitehorse Correctional Centre—almost entirely in solitary confinement

Emily Blake

In the winter of 2011 in the small town of Watson Lake, a popular tourist destination near the B.C. border known as the gateway to the Yukon, an arrest warrant was issued for a 27-year-old Tahltan man. He had previous brushes with the law, mainly assault charges. This time, the man was wanted on eight […] More »