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indigenous rights

May-June 2018

Canada’s pioneer myth

Canadians are raised to be proud of our history, attending festivals, fairs, and field trips to learn more about our colonial past. But our collective celebration may be bolstering our country's racist tendencies

Daniel Panneton

The unpunished killing of 22-year-old Cree man Colten Boushie in Saskatchewan has raised serious questions about the legacy of colonialism in shaping settlerIndigenous relations. Gerald Stanley, the white farmer who faced murder charges after shooting Boushie on his land, was ultimately acquitted by an all-white jury in February. Stanley’s acquittal fits into a long pattern […] More »
March-April 2018

“Am I Inuk enough?”

On the complex process of language reclamation among Canada's Inuit

Sarah Rogers

Alexia Galloway-Alainga pushes in a pair of earbuds to tune out the clatter of cutlery and coffee cups hitting cafeteria tables at Ottawa’s Carleton University. She looks straight into her smartphone camera, wearing a slight smile, and begins speaking: Sanngijuq, she says slowly, the last syllable coming from the back of her throat. The Inuktitut […] More »
March-April 2018

Why protesters are against an Indigenous confederacy’s deer harvest

Understanding the Haudenosaunee deer hunt and its opposition

Allyson Aritcheta

Last fall, Haudenosaunee hunters made their way to the forest with archery equipment for an annual six-day deer harvest. At Short Hills Provincial Park, just southwest of St. Catharines, Ont., the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry collaborated to create a safe space for the hunters. But despite the obvious government support, […] More »
March-April 2018

What’s the true cost of clean drinking water for Canada’s First Nations?

The Indigenous water crisis, by the numbers

Anwar Ali

Every day a member of the Kinonjeoshtegon First Nation drives 70 kilometres from Lake Winnipeg’s western shore to a store in Dallas/Red Rose, Man. to buy 40 20-litre jugs of drinking water. That water is intended for elders and single mothers on the Jackhead Reserve, as Kinonjeoshtegon is also known, who don’t have access to […] More »
January-February 2018

How a Yukon prison failed its highest-profile inmate

Michael Nehass spent more than 2,000 days in the Whitehorse Correctional Centre—almost entirely in solitary confinement

Emily Blake

In the winter of 2011 in the small town of Watson Lake, a popular tourist destination near the B.C. border known as the gateway to the Yukon, an arrest warrant was issued for a 27-year-old Tahltan man. He had previous brushes with the law, mainly assault charges. This time, the man was wanted on eight […] More »
January-February 2018

Shyra Barberstock’s online venture brings together Canada’s First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities

A look inside the Indigenous-led Okwaho Network

Sohini Bhattacharya

Shyra Barberstock was 21 years old when she met her Anishinaabe birth mother and finally gained Kebaowek status. Until then, she was unaware of her Kebaowek First Nation roots, having grown up with her nonIndigenous adoptive family. “As you can see I’m very fair skinned,” says Barberstock. “Had I not met her, I may never […] More »
November-December 2017

After a century-long absence, bison are returning to Canada’s national parks

Sixteen of the animals were successfully reintroduced at Banff National Park earlier this year

Kyle Edwards

There was a time when close to 30 million bison roamed the plains of what is now Canada and the United States. In the mid-1800s, after the influx of European settlers, the animal—once the most abundant large mammal on the continent—was hunted to near extinction. But the bison has returned to Canada’s oldest national park. […] More »
November-December 2017

B.C. clothing line takes back the appropriated designs of Indigenous communities

Section 35 tackles Indigenous stereotypes head-on with political statements people can wear

Isabelle Docto

What do the Chicago Blackhawks, Washington Redskins, and Cleveland Indians have in common? Sport and its continued appropriation of Indigenous culture. Section 35, a B.C.-based apparel company, is pushing back. Founded by friends Justin Louis and Andrew Kazakoff, Section 35 tackles Indigenous stereotypes head-on with political statements people can wear. “You can still create conversation […] More »
November-December 2017

How the government has fumbled its national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls

Indigenous communities across the country are still awaiting justice

Justine Ponomareff

In 2015, in response to decadeslong demands for action from Indigenous families, communities, and organizations, the federal government announced an inquiry into Canada’s missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit people. But three years in, the commission is behind schedule, under-resourced, and struggling to retain key members. Here, we look back on the making […] More »
November-December 2017

The best and worst of Canadian happenings: November/December 2017

Abortion pills, aging populations, and more

Carine Abouseif

THE GOOD NEWS A First Nations-led initiative in Manitoba will receive $19 million from the federal government to set up much-needed diabetes-related foot care services in the communities. The initiative is vital considering numbers showing that First Nations experience diabetes at a rate 4.2 times higher than the general population, but 34 of the 63 […] More »
September-October 2017

Trudeau performance review: Indigenous rights

For a devastatingly poor national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and no action on drinking water crises, the PM earns a failing grade

Kyle Edwards

Just last year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said: “No relationship is more important to our government and to Canada than the one with Indigenous peoples.” He promised a renewed nation-to-nation relationship—one that would uphold the treaties and constitutionally protected rights of Indigenous people while fixing the many socioeconomic crises that often plague Indigenous communities. He also […] More »