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Friday FTW: Vancouver Opens a Door to Equality

Vincent Colistro

Inequality, thy name is doorknob! Recently, here at the offices of This Magazine, where the magic of journalism comes alive, and even the chairs have a political opinion, we’ve installed a doorknob. We retired our door lever, and got a doorknob. Folks, let me tell you, I do not like it. The first morning after […] More »

A sneak peek at This Magazine’s redesign

Lisa Whittington-Hill

Here’s a preview of our exciting September/October issue. Looks a bit different, doesn’t it? The issue features our brand new look, as well as our first annual Corporate Hall of Shame. We’re really excited about the issue and can’t wait to hear what you think. The issue will be on newsstands across Canada next week. […] More »

Textile Museum of Canada clothes Toronto with its new interactive walking tour

Sue Carter Flinn

I take my hat off to the Textile Museum of Canada’s cool new project, TXTILEcity. Besides giving Torontonians a legit reason to walk down the street stuck to their smartphones, this interactive project uses Google map technology, and video and audio clips to relay the social, cultural, economic and artistic history behind Toronto’s textile and […] More »

Drew Nelson’s origami creations keep an ancient craft alive in a paperless world

Stephen Sharpe

A compact card unfolds into a three-dimensional paper scene: a polar bear atop an ice drift looking to the murky depths below, surrounded by the brilliant aurora borealis. Drew Nelson’s origami creations, like the man himself, are a harmonious, detailed and delicate reflection of his world and what he wants to contribute to it. Nelson […] More »
July-August 2011

Unearthing Vancouver’s forgotten utopian UN conference, Habitat ’76

Peter Tupper

Walk around Vancouver’s Jericho Beach in 2011 and you’ll see some odd architecture: an empty concrete wharf, a welded steel railing that overlooks English Bay, a strange rail embedded beneath the sailing club. These are all that is left of a complex of five gigantic aircraft hangars that was home to an international conference 35 […] More »
November-December 2010

In the fight for readers, the most beautiful books survive

Christina PalassioWebsite

In the last year, U.S. publisher New Directions released two irresistible books: Nox: An Epitaph for my Brother, by Canadian poet and classicist Anne Carson, and Microscripts, by Swiss modernist writer Robert Walser. They’re irresistible by virtue of their content, of course, but also their presentation: Nox is a striking accordion of a book, made […] More »
September-October 2010

Technology, ethics, and the real meaning of the “Rapture of the Nerds”

Keith NorburyWebsite

Aging sucks, says Michael Roy Ames. At 45, he sees signs of his own mortality every time he looks in a mirror—the greying and thinning hair, the creases in his face. Ames doesn’t despair, though. He expects to see the day when scientific advances will reverse his aging process, replace his body parts as they […] More »
September-October 2010

“Upcycling” turns garbage into useful products. But is it really green?

Jenn HardyWebsite

The Claim Supporters of “upcycling”— turning garbage into funky purses, photo frames, jewelry, and more—say it’s a great way to minimize what’s going into our mountainous landfills. But just how truly green is this practice? The Investigation One company that’s been making waves in the world of upcycling is TerraCycle. Partenered with such big businesses […] More »
September-October 2010

Vancouver photographer Eric Deis captures his city’s vanishing streetscapes

Jackie WongWebsite

Even after all its Olympic-related world-class-city posturing, Vancouver remains very much at odds with itself. At once a bedroom community, a wannabe metropolis, and the centre of a long-running real-estate boom, the city is like a teenager who keeps changing her clothes, says visual artist Eric Deis. “Kids grow up, they push boundaries, they try […] More »
September-October 2010

NASA’s mad-scientist plan to drill into the Earth for water

James JacksonWebsite

The billions of dollars and years of research that NASA has spent studying Mars may have finally yielded some results here on Earth. Earlier this year, NASA scientists told the UN water conference in Egypt that they could use radar technology originally developed to search for water beneath Mars’ surface to find H2O buried up […] More »
September-October 2010

Guerrilla Gardening video game sows digital seeds of change

Andrew WebsterWebsite

Can a gardening video game change the world for the better? In a medium that features an overwhelming focus on war-themed shoot-’em-ups, a video game about social change through gardening is a definite change of pace. And if the duo behind Guerrilla Gardening have their way, it will also inspire players to raise a trowel […] More »