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May-June 2018

You won’t be seeing me at the Infinity Mirrors exhibit in Toronto. Here’s why

The wait-to-reward ratio is skewed, and I'm not buying it

Jessica Bloom

In 2014, I stepped into a Yayoi Kusama infinity room at Copenhagen’s Louisiana Museum. There were only a few people in line and no formal time limit, and it was dope as hell. Surrounded by mirrors and pulsing lights, your reality becomes obliterated and it leaves you with a visceral feeling of foreverness. I took […] More »

Comedy is a reflection of our society. It’s time for it to get with the times

Racist comedy isn't funny—it's just degrading, and it's time for it to change

Hillary Di Menna

On April 8, The Simpsons aired the episode “No Good Read Goes Unpunished.” The 15th episode of the series’ 29th season addressed the issue of the racist portrayal of Kwik-E-Mart owner Apu Nahasapeemapetilon. “Addressed” insofar as Lisa Simpson looked at the camera and said, “Something that started decades ago, and was applauded and inoffensive, is […] More »
March-April 2018

How one company brings theatre to Vancouver’s Deaf population

Theatre Interpreting Services aims to make theatre inclusive for all

Kevin John Siazon

It’s 2015, and the light come up on a dark stage at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre in New York City. Two young women stand on opposite sides of an empty mirror frame. As one waves her arms in the air creating shapes to convey her curious thoughts, the other begins to sing, giving those signed […] More »
March-April 2018

New transmedia project celebrates women in the electronic music scene

Amplify Her tells the story of seven female electronic artists and their careers

Melissa Gonik

What unique perspective do women bring to the arts? This is the question west-coast filmmakers Ian MacKenzie and Nicole Sorochan want their audience to think about, especially within the realm of female DJs with their transmedia project, Amplify Her. Through a documentary-style, feature-length film, a graphic novel, and a motion comic series, Amplify Her tells […] More »
March-April 2018

Montreal group turns competitive skating into contemporary art

Meet Le Patin Libre

Allyson Aritcheta

Taking to the ice with smooth transitions and ever-changing focal points, contemporary ice skating company Le Patin Libre uses minimalistic choreography to create a performance that founder Alexandre Hamel calls “magical.” The Montreal-based troupe, founded by Hamel in 2005, focuses on providing a skating experience for its audience that’s free from competition and scores. “It’s […] More »
March-April 2018

South Asian women are finally receiving the representation they deserve in media

Prajakta Dhopade on why now more than ever they're having their moment

Prajakta Dhopade

Growing up in Canada in the mid-2000s, there was never quite a role model in Western popular culture who looked like me. As an 11-year-old, it didn’t occur to me that there was anything amiss with my pop idols, or that their portrayals of North American life were missing an important element of cultural relevance […] More »
March-April 2018

Indigiqueer storyteller Joshua Whitehead turns hope and frustration into literature

The artist, known for his captivating poetry, is now working on his debut novel

Justine Ponomareff

Joshua Whitehead has a lot to say. The 29- year-old Oji-cree, Two-Spirit otâcimow, or storyteller, often finds himself fuelled by anger: from the day-to-day frustrations to systemic-sized injustices, and Canada’s political climate and the ongoing colonization of Indigenous peoples in Canada. His collection of poetry, full metal indigiqueer, came from this fire, this feeling “of wanting […] More »

Q&A: Kenneth Moffatt on the importance of highlighting art for and by those from marginalized communities

The Ryerson University sociology professor is the 2018 Jack Layton Chair of Social Justice—and he has big plans for the role

RM Vaughan

Kenneth Moffatt is the 2018 Jack Layton Chair of Social Justice. That sounds fancy, and it is. Appointed across the Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Community Services, the Chair emphasizes the causes of the late NDP leader, and works “to effect progressive social change.” But to many Torontonians, especially those of us in the queer arts worlds, Moffatt […] More »
January-February 2018

West-coast all-Indigenous burlesque group destroys stereotypes with their performances

Meet Virago Nation

Megan Jenkins

With the first chord of “Burn Your Village to the Ground,” the song accompanying a burlesque act titled “Not Your Stereotype,” a transformation begins. The figures on stage, dressed in racist caricatures of Indigeneity—feathered headdresses, wearing “Indian” Halloween costumes, carrying “Made in China” dreamcatchers—begin to shed their layers. The commodified image of the “Indian” is […] More »
January-February 2018

New collaborative art installation brings Winnipeg residents together

The mural allows even those without an arts background to participate

Jenna Anderson

Works of art are often able to draw people together and show their connections. Ojibwe artist Jessica Canard thought up the design for her recent mural with this goal in mind. Commissioned by the National Arts Centre in partnership with the University of Winnipeg, Canard combined her years of experience making murals and facilitating art […] More »

Toronto film screenings break down female representation on the big screen

Inside the bimonthly series Bechdel Tested

Hanna Lee@hanlllee

For Erica Shiner, 2015 marked the year she first launched herself into the world of feminist activism. That May, she started a petition to stop American rapper Action Bronson from performing at Toronto’s Yonge-Dundas Square for annual music festival North by Northeast, saying his lyrics “[glorify] gang-raping and murdering women.” After gaining more than 40,000 […] More »