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July-August 2020

Labour opposes the arms trade

Trade unionists, workers, and peace activists unite against humanitarian crisis

Scott Neigh

Simon Black was watching the news on television with his one-month-old daughter on his lap. A report came on—a bombing of a school bus in Yemen by coalition forces led by Saudi Arabia, which killed dozens of children and injured dozens more. Black had one of those moments that sometimes happen to new parents, a […] More »
July-August 2020

Deliberate degrowth

Have we arrived at the moment when we need to seriously consider deceleration?

Paul Gallant

In Margaret Atwood’s novel The Year of the Flood, an outcast religious group called God’s Gardeners prepares for a pandemic by following a belief system based on pared-down consumerism coupled with kindness toward both human and non-human life. “They view us as twisted fanatics who combine food extremism with bad fashion sense and a puritanical […] More »
May-June 2020

Inside Canada’s Airbnb crisis

First, it came for our housing, now it's coming for our neighbourhoods

Nicole Beier

Just this past year, Canadian news was constantly covering stories of vacation rentals, made possible by platforms such as Airbnb, taking the housing supply hostage. When Airbnb first launched its platform in 2008, allowing anyone to rent out their home to tourists, they unleashed a swarm of people who were desperate to “live like a […] More »

Invisible labour and tangible risk

On working through a pandemic

Nisa Malli

Lately, all of my labour—domestic, creative, and income-earning—has shrunk to the space of a studio apartment. My office now doubles as my kitchen table, my gym, and my sick bed. It is a home which felt small even when I had access to third spaces for work, leisure, and exercise (such as cafes, parks, libraries […] More »
January-February 2020

The fare evasion blame game

How talking about skipping turnstiles keeps transit commissions unaccountable

Anna Bianca Roach

“Smile! You’re on fare evader camera.” Such is the message of the Toronto Transit Commission’s (TTC) ad campaign, which was rolled out in May 2019. The campaign follows a scandal that broke a few months earlier, when Toronto’s auditor general released a report estimating that the TTC had lost upwards of $60 million from fare […] More »
November-December 2018

Canada has an oligopoly problem—and we need to fix it

It's responsible for high phone bills, the Big Five banks, media concentration, and more

Ishmael N. Daro

In the five years that I’ve lived in Toronto, many of my phone conversations have started the same way: “Are you calling me from Saskatchewan?” the person on the other end will ask after seeing my caller ID. No, I tell them, I kept my Saskatchewan number because I can’t get a phone plan anywhere […] More »

The cancellation of Ontario’s basic income project is a tragedy

Some 4,000 recipients of benefits in the pilot are now without the financial support that was promised to them

James Mulvale

The cancellation of Ontario’s basic income project not only violates our obligation as a society to ensure economic security for all. It also breaches the ethical obligations we have to those participating in research, and underscores the need for a multi-faceted research methodology in designing better income security programs. The new Conservative government in Ontario […] More »
May-June 2018

Canadian taxpayers shouldn’t foot the bill for sports stadiums

Calgary's NHL team could get a new hockey arena—on Canadians' dime

Mark Hill

The National Hockey League’s Calgary Flames need a new stadium. At least their owners say they do. The 35-year-old Scotiabank Saddledome is perfectly functional, but the team owners’ dream project was CalgaryNEXT, a new Bow-riverside complex home to the Flames and the Canadian Football League’s Stampeders that may also pull in more concert revenue. The […] More »

Social enterprise in Canada is booming, finally

What it means for Canadian businesses, and why consumers need to pay attention

Samantha Scalise

In a capitalist free-market system, profit over everything seems to be the battle cry of big business and corporate strategy. However, those looking to make a positive difference and give back to the community have created a market for themselves through an innovative model of social entrepreneurship. Going into business now has a friendlier face, […] More »
March-April 2018

Inside the push for pay transparency and equity among Canada’s freelancers

Discussing income openly could help end discriminatory practices against minority communities, argue many

Allison Baker

Last summer, freelance journalist Katie Jensen shared her 2016 net income with the Twittersphere. “If we knew exactly how much Canadian freelancers, columnists, copywriters, broadcasters, and journalists made,” she wrote, “how revelatory would that be?” This question resonates with the precariously employed, who don’t benefit from certain protections linked to full-time, permanent jobs. Many have […] More »
March-April 2018

Nova Scotia has a problem with child poverty we cannot ignore

Why Canadians have been overlooking the issue for so long

Richard Levangie

Nova Scotians’ bigotry is softer and quieter than its white supremacist cousins in headline-grabbing places like Charlottesville, Virginia—but it’s no less devastating. Late last year, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released its 2017 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Atlantic Canada’s most populated province. In a single table the CCPA manages […] More »