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September-October 2018

Celebrating Indigenous writers and artists: A special feature

Featuring Gwen Benaway, Kai Minosh Pyle, Lindsay Nixon, Ziibiwan Rivers, Fallon Simard, Jaye Simpson, and Arielle Twist

This Magazine

EXPLORE THE FEATURE: Editor’s note by Gwen Benaway ● Prose by Kai Minosh Pyle ● Interview with Lindsay Nixon ● Visual art by Fallon Simard ● Interview with Ziibiwan Rivers ● Prose by Jaye Simpson ● Poetry by Arielle Twist A note from the editor: When I was asked to guest edit an Indigenous-specific supplement for This, my first instinct was […] More »
July-August 2018

Kreuzberg

New poetry by Jake Byrne

Jake Byrne

The blond Australian’s jaw is clenched in ecstasy. His jaw is clenched as if to say I’m having so much fun you can see it in my face. With a kshink! I pass my retractable claws right through his thorax. He hugs me and his staleness is battery acid. Cultural capital is the only capital. […] More »
July-August 2018

Mama’s Routine

New poetry by Fazeela Jiwa

Fazeela Jiwa

4 A.M: Awaken. Move slowly to preserve the dream. When it fades, sit up. Meditate on one word for one hour. 5 A.M: Exercise. If bones crack during yoga, use the elliptical first. 6 A.M: Wash, after listening for son’s truck to rumble alive and leave for the day. Bless his inherited armour skin. 7 […] More »
July-August 2018

I Am Almost Ready to be Analyzed

New poetry by Adam Sol

Adam Sol

The main thrust of the argument                    was that she was cold and he was an empty can of cream soda.                    Yellow jackets hummed around his gaping mouth, sampling his sugar.                    Or else she was hang gliding over treacherous cliffs while he                    refolded the family chute. She never let him see her without                    her headband on, […] More »
May-June 2018

U

Poetry by A. Light Zachary

A. Light Zachary

Yes, we’re bored—& if I could emotionally afford to leave & if your homeland weren’t burning, I would let you lead me south to one of those dozen American towns called The Palisades— make a life where the close of day, from our chrome balcony, would look like a glitter-bomb lobbed at the horizon— we’d […] More »
May-June 2018

My Teeth are Tombstones With Your Name Engraved on Them

New poetry by Kayla Czaga

Kayla Czaga

I am standing in a cemetery eating a breakfast burrito, Kyla. In its aesthetic wisdom the city irrigates this cemetery by pumping water through black tubes so that our dead, however problematically they lived, god rest them, will reincarnate as big dead trees with burgundy rotting blossoms. Don’t worry, Kyla— I know how death works. […] More »
May-June 2018

How one Toronto poet’s work has opened up conversations on mental health

Meet Sabrina Benaim

Michelle Cyca

Poetry isn’t a vocation associated with typical career paths, but even so, Toronto-based poet Sabrina Benaim’s journey has been unusually meteoric. In 2014, she performed a poem called Explaining My Depression to My Mother at the National Poetry Slam in Oakland, California. “Mom, my depression is a shapeshifter,” she begins in the video that has […] More »
March-April 2018

Head Pressed to Stone at St. Vincent de Paul Cemetery

Poetry by Shane Neilson

Shane Neilson

I say your name and I do grieve. All names dredge the deep, but they fail to take heed and sprout. Hereabouts, mustard seed got choked by conglomerate needs rendered too economic. Scrub grass debriefs our fields. Old Dutch farmers sing about crop yield and claim to have never yielded, but wrote wills to sons […] More »
March-April 2018

Unpaid Editorial Intern

Poetry by Yusuf Saadi

Yusuf Saadi

We stapled your promise inside our eyelids. Now we sleep to the image of you with a tapered blazer and leather suitcase whispering: if you work hard you can have this. So we wake at 7 a.m. Cook our lunch. Women daub makeup on their irises and men stuff their bicep muscles with protein powder. […] More »
March-April 2018

Indigiqueer storyteller Joshua Whitehead turns hope and frustration into literature

The artist, known for his captivating poetry, is now working on his debut novel

Justine Ponomareff

Joshua Whitehead has a lot to say. The 29- year-old Oji-cree, Two-Spirit otâcimow, or storyteller, often finds himself fuelled by anger: from the day-to-day frustrations to systemic-sized injustices, and Canada’s political climate and the ongoing colonization of Indigenous peoples in Canada. His collection of poetry, full metal indigiqueer, came from this fire, this feeling “of wanting […] More »
January-February 2018

Excerpt of Disney Song

Poetry by Domenica Martinello

Domenica Martinello

[i. daughters of triton] Little sister / seventh sister Daddy named us well // mollusk-soft daughters for a great barrel-chested bell /// We don’t chime in unless someone points a stick at us. //// Conductor of daughters, of pearly white belles ///// An empty shell is no way to pander ////// to your pitchfork Daddy’s […] More »