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May-June 2018

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Poetry by A. Light Zachary

A. Light Zachary

Yes, we’re bored—& if I could emotionally afford to leave & if your homeland weren’t burning, I would let you lead me south to one of those dozen American towns called The Palisades— make a life where the close of day, from our chrome balcony, would look like a glitter-bomb lobbed at the horizon— we’d […] More »
May-June 2018

My Teeth are Tombstones With Your Name Engraved on Them

New poetry by Kayla Czaga

Kayla Czaga

I am standing in a cemetery eating a breakfast burrito, Kyla. In its aesthetic wisdom the city irrigates this cemetery by pumping water through black tubes so that our dead, however problematically they lived, god rest them, will reincarnate as big dead trees with burgundy rotting blossoms. Don’t worry, Kyla— I know how death works. […] More »
May-June 2018

How one Toronto poet’s work has opened up conversations on mental health

Meet Sabrina Benaim

Michelle Cyca

Poetry isn’t a vocation associated with typical career paths, but even so, Toronto-based poet Sabrina Benaim’s journey has been unusually meteoric. In 2014, she performed a poem called Explaining My Depression to My Mother at the National Poetry Slam in Oakland, California. “Mom, my depression is a shapeshifter,” she begins in the video that has […] More »
March-April 2018

Head Pressed to Stone at St. Vincent de Paul Cemetery

Poetry by Shane Neilson

Shane Neilson

I say your name and I do grieve. All names dredge the deep, but they fail to take heed and sprout. Hereabouts, mustard seed got choked by conglomerate needs rendered too economic. Scrub grass debriefs our fields. Old Dutch farmers sing about crop yield and claim to have never yielded, but wrote wills to sons […] More »
March-April 2018

Unpaid Editorial Intern

Poetry by Yusuf Saadi

Yusuf Saadi

We stapled your promise inside our eyelids. Now we sleep to the image of you with a tapered blazer and leather suitcase whispering: if you work hard you can have this. So we wake at 7 a.m. Cook our lunch. Women daub makeup on their irises and men stuff their bicep muscles with protein powder. […] More »
March-April 2018

Indigiqueer storyteller Joshua Whitehead turns hope and frustration into literature

The artist, known for his captivating poetry, is now working on his debut novel

Justine Ponomareff

Joshua Whitehead has a lot to say. The 29- year-old Oji-cree, Two-Spirit otâcimow, or storyteller, often finds himself fuelled by anger: from the day-to-day frustrations to systemic-sized injustices, and Canada’s political climate and the ongoing colonization of Indigenous peoples in Canada. His collection of poetry, full metal indigiqueer, came from this fire, this feeling “of wanting […] More »
January-February 2018

Excerpt of Disney Song

Poetry by Domenica Martinello

Domenica Martinello

[i. daughters of triton] Little sister / seventh sister Daddy named us well // mollusk-soft daughters for a great barrel-chested bell /// We don’t chime in unless someone points a stick at us. //// Conductor of daughters, of pearly white belles ///// An empty shell is no way to pander ////// to your pitchfork Daddy’s […] More »
July-August 2017

aries [the ram]

Poetry by Doyali Islam

Doyali Islam

January-February 2018

REVIEW: New poetry collection ‘reads like a very intimate confession’

Inside Liz Worth's The Truth is Told Better This Way

Maria Siassina

The Truth is Told Better This Way By Liz Worth Book*hug, $18.00 The Truth is Told Better This Way by Liz Worth is a book of piercing poetry that reads like a very intimate confession. Worth’s poems let out their mysteries slowly and deliberately, stringing readers along a path of loneliness and grief. At times […] More »
January-February 2018

CXIII

New poetry by Sonnet L'Abbé

Sonnet L'Abbé

Stinging cells tip the tentacles fringing the polyps’ mouths. Family to sea anemone, hydra, and jellyfish, corals live in many-minded masses, anchored to hard surfaces, growing together in sync. They grow over centuries, agglomerating into reefs by secreting exoskeletal calcium carbonate under their derrières (or, they poop the architecture of their limestone foundations). Cities of […] More »
November-December 2017

REVIEW: Canisia Lubrin’s first poetry collection tackles pop culture, science, and news on race

Inside Voodoo Hypothesis

Jessica Rose

Voodoo Hypothesis   By Canisia Lubrin Buckrider Books, $18 Voodoo Hypothesis, the first collection of poetry by Canisia Lubrin, is a stunning debut that acts as a “rejection of the contemporary and historical systems that paint Black people as inferior.” Each of Lubrin’s finely crafted poems is timely, as she infuses them with pop culture, science, […] More »