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January-February 2018

How a Yukon prison failed its highest-profile inmate

Michael Nehass spent more than 2,000 days in the Whitehorse Correctional Centre—almost entirely in solitary confinement

Emily Blake

In the winter of 2011 in the small town of Watson Lake, a popular tourist destination near the B.C. border known as the gateway to the Yukon, an arrest warrant was issued for a 27-year-old Tahltan man. He had previous brushes with the law, mainly assault charges. This time, the man was wanted on eight […]

Whose job is it to tackle sexism in comedy?

The onus often falls on women—but it shouldn't

Stephanie Philp

I take improv on Wednesday nights in a basement dance studio with floors so sensitive we’re not allowed to wear outdoor shoes on them. The ratio of men to women in the class is about five to one, which is pretty normal. It’s my turn to play. On stage my scene partner stations himself at […]

Why is a proposed bill to educate Canadian judges in sexual assault law stalled in the Senate?

Tabled by former interim Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose, the bill has been stalled since December

Hillary Di Menna

When then-interim Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose tabled a bill last February that would require all judges to be trained in sexual assault law, the idea was widely embraced by all parties. The motion followed a slew of incidents wherein Canadian judges displayed astonishing fogginess on what constitutes consent. In May 2017, with politicians and […]

Defining Canada by the language of Silicon Valley

There’s a problem when people attempting to define our country's culture use the language of rejected TEDx Talks

Tyler Hellard@poploser

I spend a lot of time parsing the language of Silicon Valley, that heady mix of technobabble and pseudoeconomics where many words are used to say very little. It’s a lexicon designed by “visionary” business types (though they prefer to be called “entrepreneurs” now) and the middle managers they hire, saying words filled with pomp, […]

REVIEW: New fiction collection explores the migrant experience in Canada

Inside Djamila Ibrahim's Things Are Good Now

Jemicah Colleen Marasigan

Things Are Good Now By Djamila Ibrahim House of Anansi, $19.95 Things Are Good Now by Djamila Ibrahim is a collection of fictional narratives that explore the emotional impact of migration on humans. It’s also a stark, and necessary, reminder of the real-life experiences migrants face on a daily basis. As a former acting senior advisor […]

Dear internet algorithms: Stop invading our privacy

Big Brother is watching—and it's not cool

Megan Jones@MegJonesA

Dear internet algorithms, I know that you’re cold, calculating, and goal-driven by nature, so I’ll get straight to the point: We need to talk about your manners—or rather, the fact that you don’t seem to have any. I know you’re made up of computer code, so it’s understandable you’d favour logic and efficiency over any […]

Nunavut-based recording label Aakuluk Music is on a mission to keep—and grow—talent in Canada’s North

A look inside Nunavut's first record label

Jackie Hong

Nancy Mike knows the challenges of being a musician in Canada’s North all too well. The throat singer and accordion player for Iqaluit band The Jerry Cans recalls when the band—whose fusion of Inuit throat singing, Inuktitut lyrics, and folk-rock sound have won them an international fanbase—recorded in home studios without adequate equipment, space, or […]

Students vs. Big Oil

Canadian universities are investing in oil giants, and students are putting up a fight. Inside the battle for divestment on campuses across the country

Madi Haslam@madihaslam

On a February morning in 2017, Tina Oh and more than 50 students are waiting impatiently in Mawita’mkw, a small gathering space for Indigenous students and community members at Mount Allison University in Sackville, N.B. Anxious chatter fills the room until suddenly, it’s silent. “It’s time,” Oh tells them, and the students, dressed entirely in […]

The true cost of the Mike Duffy Senate scandal

With Duffy set to sue the Senate and attorney general for damages, the spending scandal is still ongoing

Amy van den Berg

In 2012, Conservative senator Mike Duffy was investigated for his claims of primary residency outside of Ottawa to collect outof-province living expenses. After being audited by the Senate and suspended without pay for two years, the RCMP laid 31 charges against him in 2014, including counts of fraud, breach of trust, and bribery. But after […]

Dude, where’s my canoe?

Why theft of the iconic vessel is a uniquely Canadian crime

Kyle Carney

Canada’s geography lends itself well to the canoe, our vast landscapes boasting an abundance of rivers, lakes, and coastlines. For more than 150 years, we have indulged in this mode of transportation, the vessel’s iconic shape ingrained in our national identity. Long and slender, wood or fibreglass, rounded at the bow and stern. Its image […]

The first step to tackling Canada’s opioid crisis? Understanding addiction

The roots of why people become addicted must be tackled to find lasting solutions

Tracy Giesz-Ramsay

Pacing frantically around her living room, Audrey yelled at herself in frustration: “Just put down the fucking phone!” It was mid-February and, having been sober since New Year’s Day, Audrey, 35, whose name has been changed to protect her privacy, decided to see a show with friends at Toronto’s Danforth Music Hall. After getting ready […]