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July-August 2018

REVIEW: David Chariandy’s new book speaks to the new perspectives and realities of growing up in Canada

Inside I've Been Meaning to Tell You

Nadia L. Hohn

I’ve Been Meaning to Tell You: A Letter to My Daughter By David Chariandy McClelland & Stewart (Penguin Random House), $19.95 I’ve Been Meaning to Tell You, a touching letter to his daughter by the award-winning writer David Chariandy, is a book that speaks to third-generation children growing up in a very different Canada than the […] More »
May-June 2018

REVIEW: In Elizabeth Renzetti’s new book on female experiences, the personal is political

Inside Shrewed

Jessica Rose

Shrewed By Elizabeth Renzetti House of Anansi, $22.95 In Shrewed, Globe and Mail columnist Elizabeth Renzetti asks the questions many of us ask as women: Why are there so few women in politics? Why must we feel unsafe in public spaces? Will things always be this way? However, the collection of essays really shines when […] More »
May-June 2018

REVIEW: New book explores the unlikely success of an Alberta union

Inside Jason Foster's Defying Expectations

Jessica Rose

Defying Expectations: The Case of UFCW Local 401 By Jason Foster Athabasca University Press, $34.95 Defying Expectations: The Case of UFCW Local 401 is a book about success. In it, Edmonton’s Jason Foster, an associate professor of human resources and labour relations at Athabasca University and former director of policy analysis at the Alberta Federation […] More »
May-June 2018

REVIEW: This Will Be Good paints a vivid portrait of growing into womanhood

Inside Mallory Tater's new book on burgeoning femininity

Jemicah Colleen Marasigan

This Will Be Good By Mallory Tater Book*hug, $18.00 Praise for This Will Be Good, written by Mallory Tater—a writer from the Algonquin Anishnaabeg Nation (Ottawa)—is thanks to flowing prose that evokes strong emotions. Unabashedly covering topics such as eating disorders, sexuality, and death, Tater’s stylistic voice paints a vivid portrait of a child growing […] More »
May-June 2018

REVIEW: Jen Neale’s debut novel redefines life, death, love, and grief

Inside Land Mammals and Sea Creatures

Whitney Rothwell

Land Mammals and Sea Creatures By Jen Neale ECW Press, $18.95 Despite the title of Jen Neale’s debut magic realist novel, it’s the Birds who dominate this story. Julie Bird returns to her coastal B.C. hometown to prevent her father, Marty—struggling with PTSD—from his long-desired self-destruction. When a stranger from Marty’s past arrives the day […] More »
May-June 2018

REVIEW: Journalist’s new memoir explores the history of 20th-century Ethiopia through her grandmother’s own story

Inside The Wife's Tale by Aida Edemariam

Maria Siassina

The Wife’s Tale: A Personal History By Aida Edemariam Knopf Canada, $34.00 The Wife’s Tale is an uncommon memoir that reads more like an epic, spanning decades of Ethiopia’s rich and tumultuous history, as well as one woman’s journey. It’s written by Aida Edemariam, a Canadian-Ethiopian journalist and the granddaughter of the book’s protagonist, who collected years’ […] More »
March-April 2018

REVIEW: Jordan Tannahill’s new book explores the limbo between life and death

Inside Liminal

Aaron Broverman

Liminal By Jordan Tannahill House of Anansi Press, $22.95 Destabilizing from its opening pages, Liminal by Jordan Tannahill places readers firmly between life and death, fact and fiction, consciousness and unconsciousness. A quasi-fictional version of the author’s own life, the main character, Jordan, finds his mother in bed. Unsure if she is dead or asleep, […] More »
March-April 2018

REVIEW: Novel gives a voice to Japanese-Canadians in a post-war world

Inside Floating City by Kerri Sakamoto

Jemicah Colleen Marasigan

Floating City  By Kerri Sakamoto Knopf Canada, $29.95 Floating City by Kerri Sakamoto—who was nominated for a Governor General’s Literary Award for The Electrical Field—gives a voice to Japanese-Canadians during post-WWII. Loosely inspired by Richard Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao’s plans for Project Toronto, Sakomoto takes readers on Frankie’s journey from the coasts of B.C. […] More »
March-April 2018

REVIEW: New memoir uses multiple mediums to discover the meaning of ‘home’

Inside Chelene Knight's Dear Current Occupant

Alicia Elliott

Dear Current Occupant By Chelene Knight Book*hug, $20.00 In her memoir Dear Current Occupant, writer Chelene Knight asks, “Is home a place we were, a place we are, a place we want to be, or is it simply a state of being?” Using poetry, essay, flash nonfiction, and photography, Knight weaves what she refers to […] More »
March-April 2018

REVIEW: New novel explores the intersection of technology and desire

Inside Liz Harmer's The Amateurs

Jessica Rose

The Amateurs By Liz Harmer Knopf Canada, $32.95 In The Amateurs, the first novel by Liz Harmer, a space travel device called “Port” has been created by PINA, the world’s largest tech company. Urged by nostalgia and longing, consumers are quick to use the portal to revisit their youth or to explore their futures; however, […] More »
March-April 2018

REVIEW: New book explores the feminist history of break-ups

Inside Hard to Do by Kelli María Korducki

Samantha Sobolewski

Hard to Do: The Surprising, Feminist History of Breaking Up By Kelli María Korducki Coach House, $13.95 Hard To Do: The Surprising, Feminist History of Breaking Up, by National Magazine Award-nominated journalist Kelli María Korducki, is a lifeline for women navigating expectations, standards, and break-ups in today’s liberated, but uncharted, relationships. Using examples from history, […] More »