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Arsenal Pulp Press

May-June 2018

REVIEW: Casey Plett’s debut novel challenges readers to reflect on humanity and love

Inside Little Fish

Erica Lenti

Little Fish By Casey Plett Arsenal Pulp Press, $19.95 In her debut novel, Little Fish, Lambda Literary Award-winner Casey Plett tells a heartbreaking but hopeful story about time, identity, and the intricate relationships that tie people together. The events of Little Fish take place during a Winnipeg winter, and Plett does an extraordinary job of […] More »
March-April 2018

REVIEW: New ‘lesbian supernatural thriller’ explores the realities of trauma and healing

Inside Amber Dawn's Sodom Road Exit

Allyson Aritcheta

Sodom Road Exit By Amber Dawn Arsenal Pulp Press, $21.95 Returning to Ontario’s Crystal Beach after dropping out of university and accumulating a fair amount of debt in Toronto, Starla Mia Martin doesn’t plan on sticking around her birthplace forever. Her viewpoint quickly changes when she encounters Etta, the paranormal product of a tragic death […] More »
November-December 2017

REVIEW: New dystopian novel finds influence in today’s biggest conflicts

Inside Tarry This Night by Kristyn Dunnion

Ophelie Zalcmanis-Lai

Tarry This Night By Kristyn Dunnion Arsenal Pulp Press, $16.95 Tarry This Night by Kristyn Dunnion is a dystopian tale that takes readers through the days of a bunkered polygamist cult leader, Father Ernst, and his “family.” Told from the perspectives of various family members, Dunnion’s novel reflects a dark coming-of-age story about protagonist Ruth, who must […] More »
September-October 2017

REVIEW: New novel draws on elements of Chinese mythology and magic

Inside Lydia Kwa's Oracle Bone

Ryan B. Patrick

Oracle Bone By Lydia Kwa Arsenal Pulp Press, $19.95 Oracle Bone is Vancouver-based poet and author Lydia Kwa’s latest foray into magic-realist fiction. Drawing on elements of Chinese mythology, the novel centres on an oracle bone, a mystical artifact used for divination purposes. Kwa’s unadorned prose maintains a rich, cinematic vigor, leaning on historical literary […] More »

Book review: The Dirt Chronicles by Kristyn Dunnion

Jeremy BealWebsite

In The Dirt Chronicles, Kristyn Dunnion cooks up a dozen sad, pretty, lonely stories and shoots them into whatever unused vein she can find on her audience. It’s a surprising read from an LGBT underclass perspective that starts with coming-of-age stories, wades into the most convoluted of gender politics, and builds into a crescendo of […] More »

Q&A with Charles Demers, author of The Prescription Errors

jasmine rezaee

The Prescription Errors, Charles Demers’ debut novel from Insomniac Press, is a profoundly entertaining, thoughtful and well-written story about a Vancouver-based character named Daniel who struggles to come to terms with his obsessive-compulsive disorder. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the rich, dark and contradictory nature of human relationships and politics. […] More »
September-October 2004

Read This: The best of the Canadian small press

This Staff

Like many of the contributors to Girls Who Bite Back, I grew up on a steady diet of Saturday morning cartoons, Smurfs and Strawberry Shortcake. When it came to biting back, the only superheroes and ass-kicking role models I had were Wonder Woman, The Bionic Woman and Charlie’s Angels (the small-screen version). Thankfully, things have […] More »