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Fiction

July-August 2018

I Am Almost Ready to be Analyzed

New poetry by Adam Sol

Adam Sol

The main thrust of the argument                    was that she was cold and he was an empty can of cream soda.                    Yellow jackets hummed around his gaping mouth, sampling his sugar.                    Or else she was hang gliding over treacherous cliffs while he                    refolded the family chute. She never let him see her without                    her headband on, […] More »
July-August 2018

A Seal Love Story (Sealed Fate)

New short fiction by Jen Neale

Jen Neale

Not realizing it was already occupied, the seal threw itself on the ice floe, ending, for the moment, the pursuit of the orcas. The seal’s momentum slid it straight into the monster’s leg, and feeling that unexpected warmth, it twisted, scrambled on its fins, knocked a small oar into the water, and was at the edge […] More »
May-June 2018

U

Poetry by A. Light Zachary

A. Light Zachary

Yes, we’re bored—& if I could emotionally afford to leave & if your homeland weren’t burning, I would let you lead me south to one of those dozen American towns called The Palisades— make a life where the close of day, from our chrome balcony, would look like a glitter-bomb lobbed at the horizon— we’d […] More »
May-June 2018

My Teeth are Tombstones With Your Name Engraved on Them

New poetry by Kayla Czaga

Kayla Czaga

I am standing in a cemetery eating a breakfast burrito, Kyla. In its aesthetic wisdom the city irrigates this cemetery by pumping water through black tubes so that our dead, however problematically they lived, god rest them, will reincarnate as big dead trees with burgundy rotting blossoms. Don’t worry, Kyla— I know how death works. […] More »
May-June 2018

Best Friends Forever

New short fiction by Madeleine Maillet

Madeleine Maillet

I was writing a quiz in organic chemistry when you texted me. It was the first time I ever missed a test. Technically, I didn’t miss it because there were five quizzes per term but only the four best counted toward the final mark. You thought it was funny that I was there when you […] More »
March-April 2018

Head Pressed to Stone at St. Vincent de Paul Cemetery

Poetry by Shane Neilson

Shane Neilson

I say your name and I do grieve. All names dredge the deep, but they fail to take heed and sprout. Hereabouts, mustard seed got choked by conglomerate needs rendered too economic. Scrub grass debriefs our fields. Old Dutch farmers sing about crop yield and claim to have never yielded, but wrote wills to sons […] More »
March-April 2018

Unpaid Editorial Intern

Poetry by Yusuf Saadi

Yusuf Saadi

We stapled your promise inside our eyelids. Now we sleep to the image of you with a tapered blazer and leather suitcase whispering: if you work hard you can have this. So we wake at 7 a.m. Cook our lunch. Women daub makeup on their irises and men stuff their bicep muscles with protein powder. […] More »
March-April 2018

Swimming Upright

New fiction by Kasia Juno van Schaik

Kasia Juno van Schaik@kasiajuno

  In the kitchen everyone is talking about Kendrick Lamar. Health Goths. Social workers. Lovers being just a little bit mean to each other. But who am I to judge? I who watch nature documentaries in the bath.   The bride-to-be stretches her toes on the sofa. I sit beside her and look at photographs […] More »
January-February 2018

CXIII

New poetry by Sonnet L'Abbé

Sonnet L'Abbé

Stinging cells tip the tentacles fringing the polyps’ mouths. Family to sea anemone, hydra, and jellyfish, corals live in many-minded masses, anchored to hard surfaces, growing together in sync. They grow over centuries, agglomerating into reefs by secreting exoskeletal calcium carbonate under their derrières (or, they poop the architecture of their limestone foundations). Cities of […] More »
January-February 2018

The Space Between

Short fiction by Amy Jones

Amy Jones

On the way to my first day at my new job in Edmonton, it finally happened: I found my soulmate. Thick brown hair, oystershell ears, baby blues that laserbeamed out from under a fringe of butterfly lashes. Shoulders wide as the Milky Way. Hands that could palm the moon. I was in love but he […] More »
November-December 2017

Third Eye

New poetry by Souvankham Thammavongsa

Souvankham Thammavongsa

My mother had given birth a few months ago. I thought it was odd, as she just turned sixty recently. I had not seen her pregnant. But there it was in the room, all formed. A baby boy. I didn’t know what his name was, only that she told me I could have him, if […] More »