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September-October 2011

How four of B.C.’s former company towns are reinventing themselves

Joe RaymentWebsite@Joerayment

British Columbia introduced its Instant Towns Act in 1965 during the height of an industrial boom. The policy’s purpose was exactly what the quirky name suggests: to allow the government to instantly grant municipal status to the many informal settlements surrounding its natural resources. The idea was that instant towns could prevent some of the […] More »
November-December 2010

Snowbirds Gone Wild! Canadian retirees and locals clash in Honduras

Dawn PaleyWebsite

Canada’s “Porn King” has found an unlikely second career building retirement homes in Honduras. While Canadian snowbirds snap up paradise at $85 per square foot, the locals say the developments are illegal—and they intend to get their land back I’m sitting with the cab driver who has brought me to the end of a long […] More »
January-February 2010

Booming trade in “slum tourism” dispels some myths, creates others

Mariellen WardWebsite

It can be an eye-opening experience that helps everyone involved move towards greater understanding…. It’s been happening in Rio’s famous favelas for some time. Now slum tourism—which turns a real-life ghetto into a “hot” tourist destination—has spread to Johannesburg, Manila, Cairo, and, in the wake of the blistering success of Slumdog Millionaire, Mumbai. But it’s […] More »
September-October 2004

Over the falls in a trash can

J. Nicole Guerin

As tourism grows in Ontario’s Niagara Region, with new hotels and casinos built each year, so does the amount of garbage. According to Walker Industries, which operates one of the region’s landfill sites, almost three-quarters of all garbage comes from commercial and industrial establishments. In 2002, residential waste weighed in at 110,000 tons, while industrial […] More »
July-August 2004

Yankee Go Home!

Grant ShillingWebsite

The Americanization of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, is driving up land prices in this hippie hideout–and inspiring long-time residents to take matters into their own hands More »