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November-December 2018

Dear Future Great-Grandchild… Forgive Us

The world we'll leave behind won't be a pretty one

Michael Polanyi

DEAR FUTURE GREAT-GRANDCHILD, I will likely never meet you. I will never know the mid-21st-century world in which you will live. I hope you will be blessed with the opportunities and joys that I have experienced: the magic of visiting a pristine lake, the friendliness and generosity of neighbours, an array of vocational opportunities, and […] More »
January-February 2019

We need to stop pretending there’s no Islamophobia crisis in Canada

How do Canadians view themselves through the lens of national massacres?

Brigitte Pawliw-Fry

  ON A COLD NIGHT IN DECEMBER 1989, Rachel, a first-year student at McGill University, was sitting in the emergency room with a friend suffering from a migraine. About an hour after they first arrived, paramedics began rushing women on stretchers through the ER. Rachel’s first response was confusion: She couldn’t understand why so many […] More »
January-February 2019

We’re here. We’re queer. Now what?

For LGBTQ refugees, Canada is no land of unicorns and rainbows

Amy van den Berg@vandenba

Driving back and forth along Wellesley Street in Toronto, Iris looks for a sign that she belongs. It’s late at night and raining, and she’s been blown off by a date. The woman she met on the dating website Plenty of Fish lives in Niagara Falls, and Iris rented a car for the weekend to […] More »
January-February 2019

Gene machine

I spit in a tube and uncovered secrets about my family long held under wraps by the government. My case for consumer DNA kits

Adam Elliott Segal

Illustration by CSA Images IN THE WINTER OF 2018, like millions of others across the world, I ordered a DNA test. For $99, Ancestry.com promised me a look into my family roots, using just my saliva. The kit arrived in Toronto late last winter from Utah, Ancestry’s home base. I took the collection tube out […] More »
September-October 2018

Online dating apps have a major problem with sexual harassment—but solutions must start offline

There’s no doubt dating apps have a role to play in promoting safe romantic interactions. But sexual harassment and assault are social problems—and a culture shift is required if things are ever going to get better

Teodora Pasca

Amy was sexually assaulted three years ago, and we matched on Tinder in June. Even though I’m a journalist and a stranger she met online, I’m one of the only people she’s ever told her story to. It started when Amy, who lives in Yellowknife, agreed to go for coffee with a man named Paul. […] More »
May-June 2018

The best and worst of Canadian happenings: May/June 2018

In this edition: union wins, the end of a Greyhound era, and more

Sara Tatelman

THE GOOD NEWS: – Keep speaking truth to power, comrades. In 2016, Ontario nurse Sue McIntyre made off-the-cuff comments about workplace violence at a union conference. Unbeknownst to her, the union included those comments in a press release, which a local newspaper then picked up, and her hospital fired her. But in February, a labour […] More »

Inside the startling violence that takes place in police homes

Excerpt of Alex Roslin's new book, Police Wife

Alex Roslin

Domestic violence takes place in up to a staggering 40 percent of law enforcement families. But police forces mostly ignore the problem, writes investigative journalist Alex Roslin in his award-winning book, Police Wife: The Secret Epidemic of Police Domestic Violence. The excerpt below is adapted from the book. His 2004 article in This about an RCMP […] More »
November-December 2017

The best and worst of Canadian happenings: November/December 2017

Abortion pills, aging populations, and more

Carine Abouseif

THE GOOD NEWS A First Nations-led initiative in Manitoba will receive $19 million from the federal government to set up much-needed diabetes-related foot care services in the communities. The initiative is vital considering numbers showing that First Nations experience diabetes at a rate 4.2 times higher than the general population, but 34 of the 63 […] More »
September-October 2017

The best and worst of Canadian happenings: September/October 2017

Music festival wins, botched national inquiries, and more

Carine Abouseif@carineabouseif

THE GOOD NEWS – After a strange and complicated two-month election, B.C.’s new NDP government was finally sworn in. With them came MLA Judy Darcy, the first minister of mental health and addictions, who is tasked with tackling the fentanyl crisis. The creation of the ministry has since been called “nothing short of a miracle.” […] More »
January-February 2017

How one Montreal student is fighting food insecurity in Canada’s North

Behind Eva von Jagow's DueNORTH

Michael Lyons@queer_mikey

Photo courtesy of Isaac Burkam When Eva von Jagow first learned about food insecurity and inflation in the far North in high school, she couldn’t believe it was happening in Canada. “I thought it was a disgrace. I was like, ‘There’s no way this is happening in my own country!’” says von Jagow, now a second-year […] More »
November-December 2016

How to hold Justin Trudeau to account

The prime minister has wooed Canada’s fiercest journalist watchdogs into puppy love. Inside a new citizen-run website that promises to cut past mainstream media’s crush and hold the Liberal government to account

Adam Rasmi@adamrasmi

It’s a journalist’s job to hold the government to account. But increasingly others are taking up that role, too. Last year, management consultant Dom Bernard was one such person. As the brainchild of TrudeauMetre.ca, a promise-tracking website that holds Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to his word, Bernard has created a novel government watchdog tool that’s […] More »