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March-April 2018

Why can’t Canadians afford long-term sick leave?

Erica Mojzes found herself in trouble when she needed to take time off work for an illness. She's not alone—and many Canadians are sick, tired, and struggling just to get by

Erica Mojzes

I used to dream about owning a house someday. Nothing extravagant, just a roof over my head that belongs only to me—a millennial’s dream of a room of my own. In 2012, that dream was on the horizon. I had finished my education and was living at home with my mother. She owns a modest […] More »
March-April 2018

Taking stock of naloxone across Canada

We pinpoint the availability of the life-saving opioid antidote across the country

Anwar Ali

As fentanyl rears its ugly head across Canadian communities, the country is trying to mount a counterattack against the deadly opioid. And while cities beyond Vancouver and Toronto wait for government approval to open supervised injection sites, naloxone—the lone antidote in the battle against the ubiquitous street drug—remains scarce, according to a recent Canadian Medical […] More »
March-April 2018

What’s the true cost of clean drinking water for Canada’s First Nations?

The Indigenous water crisis, by the numbers

Anwar Ali

Every day a member of the Kinonjeoshtegon First Nation drives 70 kilometres from Lake Winnipeg’s western shore to a store in Dallas/Red Rose, Man. to buy 40 20-litre jugs of drinking water. That water is intended for elders and single mothers on the Jackhead Reserve, as Kinonjeoshtegon is also known, who don’t have access to […] More »
March-April 2018

Medical cannabis users cannot afford the weed that’s keeping them healthy—and legalization won’t help

These patients are among the country’s sickest, its poorest, its most opiated. But as the country lurches toward legalization, the patients who most rely on cannabis are still struggling to pay for it

Kieran Delamont@k_delamont

On a mild February afternoon in 2014, a pastor named Chris from the Maritimes sat outside his Jeep in a park near his home by the water, and smoked a joint. There was a sense of experimentation, curiosity even. Having never smoked weed as a teenager, Chris barely knew what he was doing. He got […] More »
March-April 2018

Meet Canada’s organ transplant advocate for those living with addiction

After her husband died in 2010, Debra Selkirk made it her mission to help those deemed ineligible for transplants

Carine Abouseif

One Friday in late January, a photo on Facebook had Debra Selkirk in tears. Weeks earlier, she’d received a desperate email from a woman in the U.S. The woman’s 30-year-old sister needed a new liver, but she had to be alcohol-free for six months before she could get a transplant. The question was: Did she […] More »
January-February 2018

The first step to tackling Canada’s opioid crisis? Understanding addiction

The roots of why people become addicted must be tackled to find lasting solutions

Tracy Giesz-Ramsay

Pacing frantically around her living room, Audrey yelled at herself in frustration: “Just put down the fucking phone!” It was mid-February and, having been sober since New Year’s Day, Audrey, 35, whose name has been changed to protect her privacy, decided to see a show with friends at Toronto’s Danforth Music Hall. After getting ready […] More »
November-December 2017

Newfoundlanders and Labradorians share some of the world’s greatest genetic similarities with one another—and scientists are racing to study them

Genomic information from the province could help one company develop new medications and treat illnesses

Terri Coles

Newfoundland and Labrador’s unique culture has endured in part because its people are, in many ways, remarkably similar. But the Atlantic province faces a paradox: As its population shrinks, its shared ancestry will have to change significantly in order to survive. Now, a small group of scientists and entrepreneurs on the island are jumping on the […] More »
November-December 2017

Meet Canada’s abortion doulas

The assistants help break down the stigma for Canadians terminating their pregnancies

Sara Tatelman

In March 2012, Shannon Hardy came across dozens of headlines about Prince Edward Island’s abortion policy. The Island hadn’t offered in-province abortion services for 30 years, and those seeking terminations at private clinics had to travel to Nova Scotia or New Brunswick on their own dime. “I just thought, ‘Oh my God. I can’t believe […] More »
November-December

Social workers devote their lives to helping others. Why aren’t they receiving help themselves?

Behind the shortcomings of the mental health care industry

Shauna McGinn

Years ago, walking through downtown Ottawa made Amanda Rocheleau anxious. As a social worker at The Ottawa Mission, one of the city’s largest homeless shelters, she knew almost every homeless person by name, and they knew hers. She listened to their stories every day—of childhood abuse, neglect, struggles with addiction and mental disorders. It didn’t […] More »
November-December 2017

Is Ottawa’s proposed mega-shelter the right way to tackle homelessness?

Critics say it’s the wrong approach

Courtney Dickson

The Salvation Army is proposing an 892-square-metre “mega-shelter” in Ottawa’s Vanier neighbourhood that would provide temporary shelter beds for up to 350 people. The shelter would be the biggest in North America, featuring a special health care unit, a space for addictions recovery, permanent housing referrals, a dining facility, counselling, employment skills training, and more. […] More »

I was an opioid addict with cancer. Then, cannabis changed my life

Excerpt of Sam Mallace's new book, The Great Cannabis Conspiracy

Sam Mellace

The year 2017 will be remembered as the year Canadian media finally got serious about reporting the deadly epidemic of opioid addiction in this country. The Globe and Mail, the CBC, the Toronto Star, Maclean’s, the Huffington Post, and many other outlets have devoted not just isolated stories but aggressive ongoing coverage of what is […] More »